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Divers Drabbles
by:Raksha06
 [1] Reviewer:lindahoyland Date:April 19, 2006 2:33 PM
I actually understand this now I 've read some of the Simarillion.A very evocative look at the early days of the Elves.

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 [2] Reviewer:Amy Date:April 19, 2006 4:36 PM
I'm no fan of drabbles, but I loved these two about Huan, most faithful of companions.

I love his dismissive description of Beren, coupled with his taking Beren under his care for the sake of his mistress.

His light point of view is poignant given the unfolding of the tale.

I also loved your Aragorn healing Faramir tale and wish that I had time for a better review.

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 [3] Reviewer:lindahoyland Date:April 19, 2006 8:40 PM
I just love this,you have a great gift for writing humour

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 [4] Reviewer:lindahoyland Date:April 20, 2006 5:26 AM
This is one of my favourites of your drabbles,but as you well know, I adore ARagorn,especially in healing mode.I like to think it could have happened like this and he would call upon the Valar.

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 [5] Reviewer:Linda Date:August 4, 2006 10:54 PM
Poor Eomer, I would imagine many a brother would feel like this at his sister's wedding however worthy the groom.

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 [6] Reviewer:Branwyn Date:August 12, 2006 5:16 PM
When a craft guild sends the gift of a tapestry depicting her fight with the Witch-King, Eowyn reflects on her memories of that day. Her thoughts are reminiscent of the hobbits' reaction to their fame after returning to the Shire -- the people who were not present during the great events of that time can never understand what happened or what was at risk. With the passage of time, the story will become simplified and (to some degree) trivialized. The stylized, cartoonish depiction in the tapestry is a wonderful metaphor for this simplification of history.

Even though Eowyn is an old woman in this piece, she clearly remembers the details of her fight, which is to be expected. There is a strong sensory component to memory, and Raksha cleverly incorporates these sensory memories in the narrative -- the foul smell of the winged beast, the unnatural sound of the Witch-King's voice. The idea that Eowyn, like Frodo, might still feel pain from the wound dealt by the Witch-King is an interesting concept. I also like the idea that the shared experience of rescue from the Shadow is yet another bond between Eowyn and Faramir. It is amusing and realistic that her little grandson seems impudent to this old woman; her failing health would leave her with little patience.

A fine job with a very thoughtful piece of writing.

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 [7] Reviewer:Branwyn Date:August 12, 2006 5:23 PM
Being an evil overlord isn't all it's cracked up to be, as Morgoth finds out in this hilarious ficlet by Raksha the Demon. The lord of the werewolves discovers to his chagrin that even giant, red-eyed, snarling hellhounds start out as playful puppies. I laughed out loud at the image of the poor werewolf chewing on Morgoth's boots.

"He also had one of my boots in his mouth, and a happy look in his yellow eyes."

Even worse, trusted lieutenant Sauron can't seem to follow the simplest instructions and teaches young "Wolfie" to roll over instead of to rend and kill. As Morgoth says,
"Good help is truly hard to find."
Some rather pointed obedience training follows for his errant evil minion. Raksha doesn't write humor very often, but when she does, the results are very funny.

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 [8] Reviewer:Branwyn Date:August 20, 2006 3:59 AM
"Stewardship"
In ROTK, Gandalf tells Denethor that "I also am a steward"; Raksha takes that line as the inspiration for this lovely drabble. Though Tolkien was creating a "pre-Christian" world, the literature of Christianity is a pervasive influence on his writing. Several passages in the New Testament refer to the attributes of faithful and unfaithful stewards. (I admit to chuckling that Peter Jackson felt it necessary to have Gandalf define the word "steward" for a modern and presumably semi-literate audience.)

In this drabble, Gandalf is the faithful steward who, having labored long, now rejoices that he can turn his responsibilities over to Faramir and the members of the Fellowship. It is easy to imagine this peaceful scene in Ithilien as Faramir, Legolas, and Samwise talk avidly about plants and planting.

"...of flowers common to their lands, of preserving old trees while planting new crops."

The sight of Frodo sleeping against a tree, while the others joke and plan for the future, is a bit of a sad note. Perhaps he is still tired from his ordeals, but his experiences have also distanced him from his friends and the joys of everyday life.

I enjoyed this quiet scene very much. Well done!

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 [9] Reviewer:Branwyn Date:August 25, 2006 1:52 AM
Raksha demonstrates her talent for humor and clever dialogue in this inspired response to the "Twenty Gay Gondorians" Yule challenge at Henneth Annun. When Aragorn laments the lack of gaiety at court, Faramir recruits some suitably gay men to liven up the festivities. Distant (very distant) cousin Pongohil, an indiscriminate flirt, probably didn't get invited to many family gatherings when Denethor was around! The line "Stop him! Gimli will kill him!" made me snort with laughter. But even Faramir is surprised when Gimli and Legolas take to the dance floor.

"An Elf and a Dwarf? Is such a thing possible?"

he asks Aragorn. Evidently, Faramir hasn't read much fanfiction! A very amusing fic.

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 [10] Reviewer:Branwyn Date:October 17, 2006 11:50 PM
In this piece set shortly after Finduilas' death, Faramir's sixth birthday is celebrated at a subdued family get-together. The children and the little pup are believable and very cute. Faramir and a puppy are an irresistible combination! I love how, even at this young age, Faramir shows an understanding of animals. He knows how to approach the puppy without overwhelming or frightening it, and he also picks it up properly. Raksha's experience with dogs shows in this and also in the description of the greyhound.

Yet despite the cute children and puppy, the story never descends into sentimentality; in fact, it has a steely subtext--even when Faramir is a small child, Denethor is incapable of showing any warmth toward him. He won't even take credit for his act of kindness in giving Faramir the puppy. And how characteristically selfish of Denethor to send away the family pet who would have been a comfort to his sons. His shadow engulfing the two children as he leans over Faramir is an ominous touch since he will cast a long and dark shadow in both their lives.

It is so sad that Denethor both physically and verbally distances himself from his younger son! Imrahil's concern is well-expressed and well-founded.

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